HOSE REPAIR



Which part of the hose do you need to repair?

Do you have a crushed coupling on the female or male end? If so, choose the appropriate replacement coupling. If you have a cut or a leak in the tubing itself, you’ll need a mender.

Which style do you want?

Next, choose between a clamp-style repair and a compression-style repair. The clamp style uses two Phillips head screws and may enable you to achieve a tighter seal. Compression-style repair components require no tools and enable you to complete the repair in the least amount of time, but for those with limited grip strength the compression-style mender may be difficult to tighten adequately.

How to perform a repair with a clamp-style component.

If you are replacing a coupling:

  1. Carefully cut off the damaged end as squarely as possible.
  2. Loosen the screws on the replacement coupler.
  3. Insert the end of the hose into the clamp end of the replacement coupler. (Be sure it is fully inserted.)
  4. Tighten the screws evenly until the clamp is tight enough to prevent the hose being pulled out.
  5. Attach the hose to a sprinkler or nozzle and turn on the water to test the connection. If water leaks out, tighten the connection until water no longer leaks out.

If you are mending a leaking hose:

  1. Carefully cut out the damaged portion of the hose leaving the ends as square as possible.
  2. Loosen the screws on both sides of the replacement coupler.
  3. Insert the cut end of each section of hose into one side of the clamp mender. (Be sure they are fully inserted.)
  4. Tighten the screws evenly until the clamp is tight enough to prevent the hose being pulled out.
  5. Attach the hose to a sprinkler or nozzle and turn on the water to test the connection. If water leaks out, tighten the connection until water no longer leaks out.



How to use a compression-style repair. If you are replacing a coupling:

  1. Carefully cut off the damaged end as squarely as possible.
  2. Turn the compression collar counterclockwise to loosen it.
  3. Insert the end of the hose into the collar end of the replacement coupler. (Be sure it is fully inserted.)
  4. Turn the compression collar clockwise as tight as possible using your hands.
  5. Attach the hose to a sprinkler or nozzle and turn on the water to test the connection. If water leaks out, tighten the connection until water no longer leaks out.

If you are mending a leaking hose:

  1. Carefully cut out the damaged portion of the hose leaving the ends as square as possible.
  2. Turn the compression collars counterclockwise to loosen them.
  3. Insert the cut end of each section of hose into one side of the mender. (Be sure they are fully inserted.)
  4. Tighten both compression collars until the clamp is tight enough to prevent the hose being pulled out.
  5. Attach the hose to a sprinkler or nozzle and turn on the water to test the connection. If water leaks out, tighten the connection until water no longer leaks out.